Biomedical Engineers Develop Vascularized 3D Bioprinted Heart

Akhila Dhurjati

Adam Fienberg, a biomedical engineering professor (BME), and his team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University recently constructed the first full-size 3D bio-printed human heart model using their Freeform Reversible Embedding of Suspended Hydrogels (FRESH) approach. Feinberg had invented the technique to pervade an unfilled demand for 3D printed soft polymers, which absent the rigidity to stand unsupported as in a normal print. FRESH allows many researchers to overcome the problematic obstacles associated with current 3D bioprinting methods, and to accomplish unparalleled accuracy utilizing soft and living material. “We can now build a model that not only allows for visual planning but allows for physical practice,” depicts Feinberg. “The surgeon can manipulate it and have it actually respond like real tissue so that when they get into the operating site they’ve got an additional layer of realistic practice in that setting.”

Credit: Carnegie Mellon University

Credit: Carnegie Mellon University

From wound repair to organ bioengineering, the procedure has applications in many elements of regenerative medicine, but it is just one component of an evolving bio-fabrication field. In the United States, there are over 4,000 patients waiting for a heart transplant, while millions of others worldwide need hearts but are ineligible for the waitlist. The demand for replacement organs is tremendous, and new methods are needed to engineer artificial organs that are capable of improving, strengthening, or substituting long-term organ function.

Akhila Dhurjati

Akhila is currently a 8th grade student at Cadence Park School who cherishes her pet dog, takes an interest in medicine, and works to attend a top-tier university. In her free time, she enjoys playing soccer, hanging out with her friends, and baking with her family. In addition, she also loves to work on her personal blog and research the latest updates in the medical field. Through Enginera, she hopes to make an impact with her articles and inspire other students to become engineers themselves.